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Photodiary     2012

Looking Northeast in the Reserve

We welcome contributions by Bristol artists, writers and photographers.
This is the first time we have posted a view of the reserve by a Bristol artist.

 

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29th September

Refreshed by a  long summer break, Friends of the Nature Reserve, their resolve stiffened by the example set by the many committe members present,began to reverse the inroads made by an unusually wet summer.

The photos on this and the next page show some, but not all, of the tasks undertaken. Unfortunately our cameras did not reach all the places where work was being carried out, so apologies to those whose work is not included in this record.

The first Working Party of the new season
Click to enlarge

Photo: Jane Rooth

by Alex Rooth

 

Extract from Alex Rooth's blog

Plein Air painting on the 25th October 2012: For a change I went painting one of Bristol's lesser known nature reserves yesterday and was lucky to enjoy a full morning of sunshine. It has been very wet in England over the last few days and I was pretty much standing in bog as I painted. My feet were soaked by the end of it even though I was wearing walking boots.

The view that I painted shows two fields with the spire of a nearby church visible in the distant background. I heard the faint warbling of the church bells as I stood painting.

I would have liked to include in the picture one or more of the numerous dogs that came sniffing past as I worked. I had some good advice from one owner as her dog bounded rapidly towards me: "Don't let him cock his leg on anything." Wise words no doubt but bear in mind that I was standing in the middle of a field up to my ankles in mud with a handful of paintbrushes in one hand and a palette in the other.

Happily the dog in question spared my painting and I am able to display it for you here intact, unmarked and with all colours as intended.

Using a scythe to cut back bramble and prepare the ground for mulching.
Carole and John in the lower field begin the task of barrowing mulch to areas of the path which have reverted to bog.

The photos on this page were taken by Eileen Stonebridge, except where otherwise indicated. She also added the following comments:

Lynda raking cut grass. It is important to remove it in order to prevent nutrient enrichment of the soil. Nutrients encourage grass growth at the expense of wild flowers.

The heavy downpours on 23rd. September caused gullying on the main path. Ken is doing a repair job.

A large input of sediment accompanied the rain, so Ian, Guy and Chris continued the never ending-task of removing it from the stilling pond.

Photo: Jane Rooth

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See also on display in the Gallery
Ian is working here with the Mark II version of his unique grunge extractor, an earlier form of which was observed in action during the March Working Party.
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